HIGHER EDUCATION

Conspiring for Good works in higher education settings to hold conversations and create action plans that challenge white supremacy and help people of different races, backgrounds, and experiences utilize their power and privilege towards equity, safety and liberation.  


We can work as advisors, event planners, workshop leaders or facilitators – or any combination thereof.


Audiences: Students, Student Affair Professionals, Residential Life, Administrators, and other university officials 

Offerings:

Restorative Justice Circles

Restorative Justice Circles provide  participants with “brave” spaces for engaging in hard conversations about power, privilege, oppression and liberation. Our circle-keepers “hold the space” by helping the group establish agreements, modeling accountability, and pushing the group towards meaning positive growth. Conversations can be structured as one-time meetings or as an on-going series. They can be for identity-based affinity groups (white people, Black people of Caribbean descent) or mixed identity groups.  A facilitator for your groups' affinity group is based on availability.  


Workshops

Workshops are interactive experiences that provide content, structure and exercises. They can be customized for specific situations and needs.  They can help with effective communication, conflict transformation, leadership development, building resilience, avoiding compassion fatigue, and ways to build effective habits as anti-racists. Workshops are designed to increase awareness, clarify understanding, increase commitment, increase action, and ultimately find joy in participating in shifting power dynamics to achieve liberation for all. 


Our Approach

Our facilitators and circle keepers know hundreds of activities and are well-versed in the subject area referred to as diversity, equity, inclusion, anti-racism and anti-oppression. We will create experiences that are customized for your needs.   Here are the questions we will ask: 

  • What is the purpose of bringing us to your school? What is what you need?  What are the strengths of the groups we will work with that we should know about, and build upon? 

  • What is necessary at this moment?

  • Who are key people we should talk with to hear other perspectives and learn about dynamics? 

Sample Learning Outcomes

Depending on the activity, participants in our programming will leave with an increased ability to: 

  • Name specific structures of power in their own local context  

  • Dialogue across lines of difference

  • Increased tolerance for racial discomfort across differences 

  • Analyze and assess their participation and complicity in domination and hierarchy

  • The ability to synthesize relevant sources or texts related to intersectionality and critical race theory

  • Identify and reflect on experiences of personal experiences of racial subordination and racial domination

  • Cultivate curiosity and growth towards anti-racism, anti-oppression, pro-Blackness and pro-Liberation

  • Understanding what privilege is and what to do with it. 


Sample Learning Techniques:

  • Small groups

  • Dyads

  • Journaling

  • Talking piece

  • Video/Personal sharing/


Sample Workshops


  1. Creative Conflict Resolution

  2. Learning to Listen

  3. Leadership Styles and Skills

  4. What to do about Implicit Bias?

  5. “Uh-oh. I think I just micro aggressed! Now what?” A Co-Creation practicum

  6. “But this doesn’t apply to me, really!" Conversations for those people who feel they frequently fall outside conversations on race and identity in the United States of America 

  7. We've all Got Multiple Identities Where and how can I use my privilege for good?

Read More
 

HIGHER EDUCATION

Conspiring for Good works in higher education settings to hold conversations and create action plans that challenge white supremacy and help people of different races, backgrounds, and experiences utilize their power and privilege towards equity, safety and liberation.  


We can work as advisors, event planners, workshop leaders or facilitators – or any combination thereof.


Audiences: Students, Student Affair Professionals, Residential Life, Administrators, and other university officials 

Offerings:

Restorative Justice Circles

Restorative Justice Circles provide  participants with “brave” spaces for engaging in hard conversations about power, privilege, oppression and liberation. Our circle-keepers “hold the space” by helping the group establish agreements, modeling accountability, and pushing the group towards meaning positive growth. Conversations can be structured as one-time meetings or as an on-going series. They can be for identity-based affinity groups (white people, Black people of Caribbean descent) or mixed identity groups.  A facilitator for your groups' affinity group is based on availability.  


Workshops

Workshops are interactive experiences that provide content, structure and exercises. They can be customized for specific situations and needs.  They can help with effective communication, conflict transformation, leadership development, building resilience, avoiding compassion fatigue, and ways to build effective habits as anti-racists. Workshops are designed to increase awareness, clarify understanding, increase commitment, increase action, and ultimately find joy in participating in shifting power dynamics to achieve liberation for all. 


Our Approach

Our facilitators and circle keepers know hundreds of activities and are well-versed in the subject area referred to as diversity, equity, inclusion, anti-racism and anti-oppression. We will create experiences that are customized for your needs.   Here are the questions we will ask: 

  • What is the purpose of bringing us to your school? What is what you need?  What are the strengths of the groups we will work with that we should know about, and build upon? 

  • What is necessary at this moment?

  • Who are key people we should talk with to hear other perspectives and learn about dynamics? 

Sample Learning Outcomes

Depending on the activity, participants in our programming will leave with an increased ability to: 

  • Name specific structures of power in their own local context  

  • Dialogue across lines of difference

  • Increased tolerance for racial discomfort across differences 

  • Analyze and assess their participation and complicity in domination and hierarchy

  • The ability to synthesize relevant sources or texts related to intersectionality and critical race theory

  • Identify and reflect on experiences of personal experiences of racial subordination and racial domination

  • Cultivate curiosity and growth towards anti-racism, anti-oppression, pro-Blackness and pro-Liberation

  • Understanding what privilege is and what to do with it. 


Sample Learning Techniques:

  • Small groups

  • Dyads

  • Journaling

  • Talking piece

  • Video/Personal sharing/


Sample Workshops


  1. Creative Conflict Resolution

  2. Learning to Listen

  3. Leadership Styles and Skills

  4. What to do about Implicit Bias?

  5. “Uh-oh. I think I just micro aggressed! Now what?” A Co-Creation practicum

  6. “But this doesn’t apply to me, really!" Conversations for those people who feel they frequently fall outside conversations on race and identity in the United States of America 

  7. We've all Got Multiple Identities Where and how can I use my privilege for good?

Read More